James Hall at the University of New Hampshire

Back to list view
Application range

Offices, Schools and Universities

Type

Reference

  • Task
  • Solution
  • Result
The James Hall at the University of New Hampshire from 1929, home for the department of Earth Sciences and the department of Natural Resources & the Environment, was renovated and reopened in 2010. The $34.2 million renovation and expansion of the building was designed by Shawmut Construction & Design and EYP Architecture & Engineering with support from the UNH architects and campus planning department to be as ecologically as possible and to focus on sustainability and energy efficiency. To meet the LEED® Gold requirements, some sustainable features never before used on that campus were included, as the gray water system or a chilled beam technology, so that the James Hall is the first LEED® certified building on campus. Photo credit: UNH Photographic Services
To meet the requirements of sustainability and energy efficiency TROX USA provided active chilled beams Type DID302 & DID602 in this project. This chilled beam systems combine the airflow characteristics of ceiling diffusers with the energy saving benefits of heat absorption using chilled water. They provide a high cooling load while less electrical energy is required than with conventional cooling systems. This can be ensured by using primary air energy to induce air through the coil and therefore no motors e.g. are required. The chilled beams help to reduced energy costs, ductwork and plant room sizes and can realize capital cost savings. Photo credit: UNH Photographic Services
The University of New Hampshire focused on sustainable and energy-efficient features for the renovation of the James Hall. The design team included some sustainable innovations in this building, that were never before used on the campus. In addition to the chilled beam system, which was also used for the first time, a gray water system was installed to collect and recycle rainwater and a daylight system, that automatically turns off the light, when enough natural daylight is available. 
All features are connected to occupancy and motion sensors for optimal energy savings. Active chilled beams can help to considerably lower energy use than traditional air conditioning systems. Photo credit: UNH Photographic Services

Share page

Recommend this page

Recommend this page by sending a link by mail.

Fields marked with an (*) are required fields.

Share page

Thank you for your recommendation!

Your recommendation has been sent and should arrive shortly.


Contact

We are here for you

Visual contact Visual contact

Please specify your message and type of request.
Tel.: +1-770-569-1433 | Fax: +1-770-569-1435

Fields marked with an (*) are required fields.

Contact

Thank you for your message!

Visual contact Visual contact

Your message is send and will be processed shortly.
Our department for Service-Requests will contact you asap.
For general question regarding products or services you can also call:
Tel.: +1-770-569-1433 | Fax: +1-770-569-1435

Contact

We are here for you

Visual contact Visual contact

Please specify your message and type of request.
Tel.: +1-770-569-1433 | Fax: +1-770-569-1435

Attachment (max. 10MB)

Fields marked with an (*) are required fields.

Contact

Thank you for your message!

Visual contact Visual contact

Your message is send and will be processed shortly.
Our department for Service-Requests will contact you asap.
For general question regarding products or services you can also call:
Tel.: +1-770-569-1433 | Fax: +1-770-569-1435